The Joy and Freedom of Manual Mode

I remember the days –  I’d take a few blurry shots here, a few underexposed shots there, and find the occasional decently exposed and in focus shot somewhere amidst all the not so good ones. I’d take a bunch of photos, and wonder why they didn’t look good – but I never dug deeper to find out why.

Continue reading “The Joy and Freedom of Manual Mode”

Oxbow Photo featured in Golden Gate Audubon Society’s 2020 Calendar

Oxbow Photo is proud to announce one of our photos (B.Vogt: Brown Pelican) was selected for the National Audubon Society, San Francisco Bay Chapter’s Annual Calendar.

If you are a lover of the outdoors and nature, consider supporting your local Audubon Society chapter or the National Audubon Society through donations, become a member, or purchase this calendar. A recent study has shown bird populations in North America have plummeted to all-time recorded lows, and are in desperate need of our help. All proceeds from the calendar support Golden Gate Audubon Society’s programs. The Audubon Society works to protect, restore, and enhance habitat for the benefit of both birds, but also for other wildlife and humanity. Audubon provides funding and manages programs for scientific research, advocacy, and on-the-ground conservation actions.

Why I still shoot Micro Four Thirds in a full-frame mirrorless world

Mine’s bigger than yours.

In the past year, the world has witnessed a steady stream of full-frame mirrorless camera releases. We’ve got a full suite of Sony Alpha full-frame mirrorless cameras (with more, including the A7R IV on the way), and newcomers including the Nikon Z, Canon R, and Panasonic S series. I can imagine someone interested in purchasing a serious camera for the first time would naturally gravitate towards these full frame models, if for no other reason than these cameras are getting the lions share of marketing attention. A bigger sensor must be better, right?

Is a large format camera necessary when a smaller format is giving you the results you desire?
Continue reading “Why I still shoot Micro Four Thirds in a full-frame mirrorless world”

FotoPro EGL-65 Eagle Series Carbon Fiber Tripod and E-6H Gimbal Review – A Lightweight Option for Wildlife and Landscape Travelers

Fotopro EGL-65 with E-6H Gimbal (Olympus E-M1X mounted)

Preface

Tripods are one of those pieces of photography equipment I tried to avoid buying for a long time. In part, it’s because I’ve benefited from the excellent built-in image stabilization provided by the micro-four thirds cameras that I have used over the years, but I also never liked carrying extra weight when I didn’t have to. Still, there are times when I have found that a tripod is an indispensable tool. This includes situations where I must be patient and wait for a wildlife subject to appear, or when shooting macro subjects where maximum stability is required. Holding a camera with a telephoto lens at your eye for long periods of time can be extremely fatiguing, and not having a tripod near the correct position at the right moment could lead to missed or blurry shots. Tripods are also exceptionally useful for stabilizing video.

Continue reading “FotoPro EGL-65 Eagle Series Carbon Fiber Tripod and E-6H Gimbal Review – A Lightweight Option for Wildlife and Landscape Travelers”

Upcoming nature photography workshop – Point Reyes, September 27-29th

If you are local to the SF Bay Area and are just getting started with nature photography, Bobby will be co-instructing a workshop hosted by the Western Chapter of the Wildlife Society on September 27th and 29th: Click here for registration. This workshop will focus on a variety of nature photography subjects targeted towards the serious beginner. Workshops are the fastest way to learn a lot of skills in a condensed period of time, and they are always a lot of fun. Bobby will be presenting on a number of topics including action/bird photography and print making along with co-hosts Sarah Bettleheim and Brian Freirmuth

Brown pelican